900 South Grand Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63104 / Cake artist: Genevieve Esson

*National Register of Historic Places*

 

One of three historic standpipe water towers in St. Louis still left standing….the others are at Bissell and Grand Avenue. There are actually seven of them left standing in the United States. Compton Hill Water Tower stands 179 feet tall, and 194 iron steps lead to the top of the tower! It was designed by Harvey Ellis, who was known for working on the Head House at St. Louis Union Station, as well as City Hall. The standpipe helped to control the dangerous surges in the city’s pipes caused by the reciprocating pumps and maintain an even water pressure. In 1929, the water tower ended its service. In later years it would be opened to the public for tours until 1984 (due to safety reasons). By 1998, a $19 million project for renovating the tower took place, and the place was alive again, welcoming visitors who wanted to see a great 360 degree view of St. Louis. Tours are available on certain days during the year (check website for more information).

The water tower
The water tower
The cake sat at the bottom near the entrance
The cake sat at the bottom near the entrance
Also located at the Compton Hill Reservoir Area is the controversial 'Naked Truth' statue
Also located at the Compton Hill Reservoir Area is the controversial ‘Naked Truth’ statue

Cake placement date: March 6

Where is the cake now?:  The cake continued to sit by the tower; however, on 2/26/2015, it was reported missing and stolen. It was never found.  (April 2017)

Notes: It was said by the cake’s artist, Genevieve Esson, that the people in charge of the Compton Hill Reservoir Area wanted to keep their cake.

Compton Hill Water Tower Park & Preservation Society on Facebook

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