801 Strodtman Road, St. Louis, MO, 63138 (near Spanish Lake) / Cake artist: Rich Brooks

 

One of two areas where you can get up close to the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers is Columbia Bottom, which was named after a village that once existed on the land where it sits. The village was formed sometime during the early 19th-century, and it was later renamed St. Vrain. Perhaps due to obvious reasons (it was on a floodplain), the town was no more by 1870. The land was purchased in 1997 to create an urban conservation area. It is 4,256 acres. Several activities can be done by the visitors. Hiking, fishing, horseback riding (seasonal) and bird watching are just a few to name. Many trails can be accessed in this area, and several markers contain information about either history and/or the habitats that venture on the land. The land includes a 110-acre island, and about 800 acres of bottomless forest. One of the missions of the Missouri Department of Conservation (which manages the area) is to help restore the habitat and scenery which matched the voyage of Lewis & Clark.

The visitors center, not far from where the cake was placed
The visitors center, not far from where the cake was placed
Its a few miles from the visitors center, but it is worth the drive to see the two rivers meet!
Its a few miles from the visitors center, but it is worth the drive to see the two rivers meet!

Cake placement date: October 25

Where is the cake now?:  The cake sold in the biddingforgood auction for $505 on 1/1/2015.

Memories:  This was the final cake that was placed at a permanent location. It was marked with a special ceremony on the morning of 10/25/2014, with over 100 people in attendance, including local media, Erin Budde and the cake’s artist, Rich Brooks.

Rich Brooks, the cake’s artist, on painting the cake: ‘(The cake that was) supposed to be the last was created for Columbia bottom. It is an agricultural area that feeds not only animals but peoples hunger for getting out with nature. Their walking paths a, miles and miles of them. They have a visitor center a river’s edge trail fishing areas an hunting areas. Dear an wildlife are abundant. Each year crops are grown specifically for a variety of wildlife. On my cake I had some flowers wildflowers dear beavers hunters fisherman ducks and geese. Again I tried to set show some of the seasons as they happening happened from floodwaters to fall an spring. This cake has an unveiling because it was one of the last cakes to be painted for STL 250. It was a very hot day and it seemed like hundreds showed up for the unveiling. For some reason I was treated like a superstar.’

Columbia Bottom Conservation Area on Facebook / Official website (through Missouri Department of Conservation)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *